The Best ATV Mud Tires for Mud Season

ATV mud tires are a must this spring!

Get The Best ATV Tires So You Don’t Get Stuck in the Mud

Spring is just about here, so you know what that means! Mud season is upon us. If you’re anything like us, you’ve been itching all winter to get back on the trails. Flinging dirt, riding with your buddies, does it get any better? Well if you get stuck in the mud, it can definitely get a lot worse.

But is there any avoiding it in mud season? Well, the answer is yes! If you’re a serious rider, and if you’re reading our blog you probably are, you need yourself a new set of wheels. Keep reading to see all of the best mud tires you can get for your ATV this mud season.

The Best ATV Tires For Mudding

the best ATV mud tires for mudding

So what are the best tires for mudding? Well, we can tell you one thing, it’s probably not your stock set of wheels. While your stock tires will get you through most situations, they’re designed kind of like your all-weather tires for your car. They’re pretty good at handling all sorts of different situations, but it can have trouble in extreme conditions. 

Getting stuck up to your waist in mud is definitely one of those extreme conditions. So what do you do to make it through the mud? Well, you have to come prepared for it, of course! So let’s take a look at what makes a mud tire so much better. 

What Makes an ATV Mud Tire Different?

Your regular tires are going to get you through a lot of tough situations. But for the most extreme terrains, you will really need some extra power. 

Let’s take a look at some of the benefits of mud tires

Let’s take a look at some of the benefits of mud tires:

  • Better Performance – One of the most important things your mud tires will do is power you through those really rough patches of mud. If you get yourself stuck with normal tires, you can get yourself in some deep trouble. Dirt, water, and other particles can get into your engine, cake up your shocks, and cause huge amounts of expensive damage if not taken care of quickly. With the added power of mud tires, your ATV won’t get a chance to get stuck! 
  • Traction – Loose terrain like rock, or even some dirt can cause you to lose traction on your ATV. While this might happen occasionally and it’s fine, it can spell some serious trouble in the wrong situation. The deep grooves of mud tires are made to stick to the ground and give you a firm grip on the earth beneath you. 
  • Durability – Your ATV tires should be durable, period. But with mud tires, you’re getting an entirely new level of durability. The tires are made to be thicker and tougher to handle more intense terrains and harsher obstacles. Any ATV tire is made to be tough, but a mud tire has that added durability to depend on for a long time. 
Your ATV tires should be durable, period

Heavy Duty Vs. All-Terrain ATV Mud Tires

One consideration you’re going to have to make when looking for mud tires is what type of mud tires you want. They fall into two basic categories: heavy-duty and all-terrain tires.

Heavy-duty tires are going to be the toughest tires that money can buy. They’re great for all different types of off-road terrain including rocks, gravel, dirt, mud, and just about anything you can think of. They’re designed with incredibly thick treads to give the best traction possible.

However, they are not good for use on the street. Heavy-duty mud tires are best for an ATV that you can trailer to and from your favorite trail.

All-terrain tires do the best they can to give that same durability and traction. There’s definitely nothing wrong with all-terrain mud tires, they’re just not quite as aggressive as their heavy-duty cousins.

However, all-terrain tires are usually better at street riding meaning you can ride your ATV straight to your favorite trail without trailering. 

What You Need to Know Before Looking at mud tires for your ATV this spring

What You Need to Know Before Looking at ATV Mud Tires

So just like with anything, there’s plenty to know about ATV mud tires (if you couldn’t tell from this blog already). Nobody wants to walk into a store and look like they don’t know what they’re talking about.

Even worse, nobody wants to walk into a store looking like they don’t know what they’re talking about and then get taken advantage of. So here are some things you want to know and think about before you start shopping:

ATV Mud Tire Features

ATV Mud Tire Features

  • Tread – On tires, you’ll see treads rated as a “ply-rating”. In the most basic sense, this just means how big the space between the treads is. The larger space is, the easier your tires grip onto the surface. ATV mud tires are usually rated from 6-ply up to 10-ply. Some thicker tread patterns are even designed to eject mud and stones from your tires as they spin.
  • Sidewalls – Your sidewalls are another feature of the tire that has their own rating you want to consider. Just like with your treads, sidewalls are rated by a ply-rating, usually from 3-ply and up. The thicker your sidewalls are the more durable your tires will be against punctures.
  • Shoulder Tread – In addition to the tread on the direct outside of your tires, mud tires also feature shoulder treads. This helps to give you more stability and traction when shouldering turns. The wider your treads go onto the shoulder, the more traction you’re going to have. 

All of the Best ATV Tires For Riding in the Mud

we love the ITP Mega Mayhem  ATV mud tires

ITP Mega Mayhem 

First on our list comes from one of the originators in the mud tire world, ITP. They were one of the first companies to manufacture a specific mud tire for ATVs called the Blackwater tires. ITP is still making some of the finest tires you can buy, and the Mega Mayhem is our top pick!

It’s a tire that’s great at sinking down and finding whatever traction there is to be had below the surface of that mud. It’s not great for paddling through the really deep lakes of mud you’ll find some places, but there are few tires you can count on for so much control. 

we love the SuperATV Assassinator Mud Tires for the mud season

SuperATV Assassinator Mud Tires 

Next up on our list is a seriously badass set of tires from SuperATV, the Assassinator mud tires. The real treasure of the Assasinators comes from the tread design.

They’re designed to be self-cleaning, flinging off all the unwanted mud, muck, rocks and more. The extremely deep treads actually even wrap all the way around the tire to the rim. It gives you unparalleled traction while shouldering.

It’s also designed to give you great traction anywhere else. Whether you’re spinning through mud, dirt, rocks, or anything else, those treads are going to bite down deep and keep you moving. It’s a great tire for the most extreme off-road conditions.

High Lifter Outlaw III ATV mud tires are super great on the trails

High Lifter Outlaw III

High Lifter are well known for making some fantastic quality tires and their mud tires are no different. The original model, the Outlaw I, and its predecessor, the Outlaw II are both well-revered designs in mud tire technology. The Outlaw III carries on that tradition by being one of the highest quality tires you can take into the bog. 

Just take a look at how it handles in clay and mud. The deep tread designs are able to handle a multitude of different terrains and really dig in to find solid traction. The tread designs have been steadily improved upon from model to model and we have to say, they’ve truly outdone themselves with the Outlaw III!

the ITP MudLite II ATV mud tires will rock the muddy trails this spring

ITP MudLite II

Now we’ve already discussed ITP, but they’re good enough to show up twice on our list! The MudLite is one of their best selling tires due to its fantastic design, and the MudLite II is even better! While the wheel is based on the original model and features a lot of similar design, the improvements are really awesome. 

One of the biggest improvements is the claw tread added between the larger treads. The purpose of these smaller and more shallow treads is to reduce suction on your tires.

If you’re in the mud long enough the wells between your treads can fill with mud and create a suction effect. This hangs onto the mud and doesn’t allow for your treads to grip the dirt. With these added, smaller treads, it reduces the tires’ ability to act like a mud magnet giving you better traction throughout the day.

who doesn't love the Maxxis Maxxzilla ATV mud Tires?

Maxxis Maxxzilla

One last one on our list today, but certainly far from the least is the Maxxis Maxxzilla. These bad boys are big, beefy, and give you the extreme control you’re looking for. One notable feature of the Maxxzillas is that the treads are very soft and pliable. Now, this isn’t to say that you should be worried about punctures.

What that actually means is that it’s extremely well equipped to form itself and grip onto just about any surface. Maxxzilla tires are like a chameleon, ready to adapt to any terrain, any surface, and give you the best handling possible. 

Staying Ahead of the Pack With the Best ATV Mud Tires

Staying Ahead of the Pack With the Best ATV Mud Tires

There’s always that one person in the group. They’ve been stuck in the mud for 15 minutes, and it doesn’t look like they’re getting out anytime soon. Everyone takes a break, gets out the tow rope and gets them out of trouble. It takes time out of the day, and that’s less time you get to spend tearing up the trails.

What’s even worse is when you are that person. No one wants to be the person holding everyone else up, so give yourself an upgrade this year! Slap some new mud tires on your favorite ATV and get down to business this mud season!

Get Ready for Spring with this ATV Maintenance Checklist

What You Should Be Doing for Routine Maintenance

What You Should Be Doing for Routine Maintenance

The weather is starting to get warmer, the birds are coming home from migration, and the flowers are almost in bloom. Spring is right around the corner so you know what that means: mudding season is almost here! 

The most wonderful time of year for ATV enthusiasts is coming up fast, so are you ready for it? Not just ready to ride, but have you done your routine maintenance this year? Of course, we all just want to get out on the trails, but before we take our first ride of the year let’s get ready for spring wit this ATV maintenance checklist. 

Annual Routine Maintenance Checklist

Get Ready for Spring with this ATV Maintenance Checklist

So before we get started, you might be asking, how often should I be doing maintenance on my ATV? Of course, you want to address any mechanical issues you have as they come up. Waiting on any small issue can turn it into a more serious issue. 

However, outside of emergency repairs or replacements, you want to run through your maintenance checklist at least once every year. We recommend doing it when winter rolls around and the season is over. That way spring finally arrives you’ll be good to go! But if you’re not a model citizen like us, doing it before the spring season starts is perfect, too. 

Check Your Fluid Levels

Get Ready for Spring with this ATV Maintenance Checklist

The first thing you want to do when you’re doing your pre-season tune-up is to check your fluid levels. That means your oil of course, but also things like your brake fluid and even your fuel. If you left your ATV sitting over the winter with any fluid in it, make sure you check them.

You want to check to see what your oil looks like as well. If it’s chunky or grimy at all, it’s time for an oil change. You also want to look out for a milky, brown color to your oil. This could possibly mean that water has leaked into your oil tank. This could cause serious damage to your engine and your ATV if you don’t swap it out.

Check Your Tires

Your tire’s ability to grip the dirt is what keeps you safely stopping, so it’s important to check.

Your next step should be taking a look at your tires. You want to check the air pressure, of course (check out your owner’s manual for factory recommendations). However, you also want to be checking your tread depths. Your tire’s ability to grip the dirt is what keeps you safely stopping, so it’s important to check.

Also, take a look at your valves and make sure they aren’t leaking. Keeping your tire pressure at the correct level and keeping it there consistently keeps you safe. A leaking valve may not seem like a make-or-break thing right now, but it becomes a bigger problem if left unchecked. 

Cleaning or Replacing Your Air Filter 

Cleaning or Replacing Your Air Filter should be a part of your ATV maintenance checklist this spring

You love mud. Your ATV loves mud. Your air filters do not love mud. But they’re along for the ride, so they’re gonna get dirty. It’s not very glamorous, but making your air filters part of your yearly maintenance routine is going to keep your ATV running like new. When your filters get dirty it’s allowing less air intake to your engine. This seriously hinders your performance.

Now, you can clean your air filters. It’s not very difficult and you can do it pretty quickly. However, just cleaning them isn’t going to make your ATV run as well as a full replacement. We would definitely recommend a full swap out at least every other year. However, if you change your air filters every year, you’re going to notice that difference in performance.

The Nuts and Bolts 

Every year you definitely want to run over your ATV with a fine-tooth comb checking all of your screws, nuts, and bolts.

Speaking of not very glamorous, this is another job that doesn’t get the press it deserves. Every year you definitely want to run over your ATV with a fine-tooth comb checking all of your screws, nuts, and bolts. A year of rough riding is sure to knock a few loose. 

The most important place to check is your undercarriage. This is the part of your ATV that’s taking the most wear and tear. If you find any that are seriously rusted, go ahead and swap them out. It may not be the first thing you think about when you’re going over your maintenance checklist, but it’s definitely important.

Keeping Your ATV in Good Health with a Yearly ATV Maintenance Checklist

The more maintenance you perform on your ATV the easier it’s going to be on you and your machine.

You want your ATV to be ready for anything. You want to be able to hit any hill, get through any muddy trail, and do it all easily. The more maintenance you perform on your ATV the easier it’s going to be on you and your machine.

You wouldn’t skip your kids’ yearly physicals and your ATV is like your baby right? So you have to get it in for that annual checkup so it can give you a full day’s ride every time.

We hope this ATV maintenance checklist was helpful! If you need some more helpful tips, take a look at our blog for tips on mudding this spring

What You Need in Your Snowmobile Emergency Kit

emergency snowmobile kits are a smart thing to have with you every time you hit the trails

An On-The-Trail Survival Kit for Any Emergency Situation on Your Snowmobile

There’s nothing better than getting out on the trails on your snowmobile. It’s early on a Saturday, the kids are at their friend’s house, and you’re out on your snowmobile with all your best buds. There’s nothing more carefree in the world! But as carefree as you are when you’re out there, you can still run into emergency situations. The thing about an emergency is that you never plan on having one. But when you’re miles away from the nearest paved road, you need to be prepared for anything! So if you’re going out on the trails this weekend and want to stay safe, let’s talk about everything you need in your snowmobile emergency kit. 

Building Your Snowmobile First-Aid Kit

what do you need to be prepared for when you build your emergency snowmobile kit

What Do You Need To Be Prepared For? 

Before we begin building our snowmobile emergency kit we need to know what kind of snowmobile emergencies we are preparing for. Not everything in your kit is going to be for the highest emergency situations. Some things in the emergency kit will just be to make our riding experience a little easier.

So what kinds of actual emergencies are we preparing for?

  • Becoming Stranded – Snowmobiling often occurs in fairly remote places. Becoming lost, running out of gas, or running into mechanical issues with your snowmobile are all real possibilities
  • Injuries – Your snowmobile isn’t the only thing that can break down. Taking a nasty spill can bang up your bike, but banging up your body is an even worse result. 
  • Snowmobile Trouble – Sometimes an emergency isn’t anything as dramatic as an avalanche. Sometimes just going a couple of seasons without any maintenance will put you in a situation where your snowmobile is in trouble and so are you.

What Do you Need in Your Snowmobile Emergency Kit?

These are far from the only emergencies we will find ourselves in out on the trails. However, these are some of the most common troubles we’re going to have. You can’t prepare for everything that’s going to happen out there, but you can be prepared for what you can expect. 

What Do you Need in Your Snowmobile Emergency Kit?

Food and Water 

In an emergency situation, the most important thing you can do is to keep your wits about you. That, of course, means staying awake and alert and one of the best ways to do that is to keep hydrated and eat high-calorie snacks. Of course, this keeps your energy levels up, but it also does another really important thing: it keeps your body temperature high while you’re out in the cold.

for your kit, get foods that are high in calorie content and easy to carry around.

Some examples of great, light-weight, high-calorie snacks to bring with you on your rides are:

  • Nuts
  • Energy Bars
  • Granola
  • Peanut Butter

Mainly you want to get foods that are high in calorie content and easy to carry around. We don’t want to take up too much space trying to pack a whole steak dinner.

first aid kits are an essential part to have with your emergency snowmobile kit

First- Aid Kit

One of the emergencies we absolutely need to be prepared for is a personal injury. This could be anything as minor as getting a scrape or twisting an ankle or as serious as a broken bone. The main thing to remember is that we can never be sure what sort of emergencies might occur, so we need to prepare for anything. Here are some things you should think about keeping in your mobile first-aid kit:

  • Bandages of varying sizes
  • Gauze for dressing wounds
  • Tape and scissors
  • An antiseptic cream
  • Aspirin
  • Disposable, sterile gloves

You don’t need to have a mobile hospital with you. These are some of the essentials, and you’ll probably bring a little more but you don’t need to make every pound you pack first-aid equipment. The point of your first-aid kit is simply to keep an injured person safe and comfortable until emergency responders get to you. 

you should never leave home for the trails without your cellphone.

Electronics 

Of course, you should never leave home for the trails without your cellphone. How else would you know it was dinner time? In addition to your phone, though, there are some electronics we can pack up to bring with us to keep us safe in emergency situations.

The first item you want to consider is a backup battery for your mobile phone. You don’t want to be waiting for emergency responders and worrying that they won’t be able to find you with a dead cell phone.

Another item you should consider investing in is an avalanche transceiver or avalanche beacon. An avalanche beacon is a small radio device that you keep on your person. The device emits regular radio pulses that emergency responders would be able to find if you were caught in an avalanche under the snow. However, this is NOT a replacement for knowing snow and trail conditions

One more thing you need to be prepared for is your snowmobile breaking down.

Replacement Parts

One more thing you need to be prepared for is your snowmobile breaking down. While you’re not going to bring a whole new motor with you, there are some simple items you can keep with you while you’re on the trail. Some light-weight spare parts to keep with you are:

  • An extra drive belt
  • Some spark plugs
  • Basic tools to perform repairs

You might also want to consider what’s going to happen if you get yourself stuck in a ditch. Bringing along some rope to help pull yourself out isn’t a bad idea. 

bring some rope just in case you get stuck on the trail

Staying Safe until Help Arrives

So if you do run into that emergency, there’s another factor to consider: how to keep yourself safe until help arrives. Here are some things you can keep with you to make staying safe and getting found easier:

 Study your maps before you leave and try to stay in areas where you can locate yourself.
  • Waterproof matches/lighter and a hatchet: If you’re going to be stuck for a while a warm fire is going to be your best friend. A small hatchet or wood saw to cut down some tinder will make this much easier
  • Maps: while you obviously have GPS on your cell-phone, you also want to have a good idea of where you are. Study your maps before you leave and try to stay in areas where you can locate yourself. That way emergency responders can locate you later on.

Staying Safe with Your Snowmobile Emergency Kit

 when you’re gone for a few hours in the heart of the forest, you’re running into different kinds of danger, so make sure you have a snowmobile emergency kit ready

Staying safe when you’re out on the trail takes more than just a helmet. The truth is, you never quite know what’s going to happen when you leave the house. That’s always true.

But when you’re gone for a few hours in the heart of the forest, you’re running into different kinds of danger. It could be wildlife, forces of nature, or just making the wrong move on your snowmobile. No matter what happens, if you follow these tips you will stay prepared for anything!

Look at these 7 Awesome Vintage Snowmobiles

7 vintage snowmobiles you just have to read about

Respecting the Classics

Around the holiday season, it’s easy to get worked up about the new snowmobiles on the block. They’ve got new electric starts, BlueTooth sound systems, and digital displays. They’ve got all the new gear to really turn heads. But nothing really turns heads like a classic, right? There’s just something about those old race sleds that takes you back. The shape, the sound of the motor – it all makes you think of the glory riding days of yesteryear. Let’s take a minute to walk down memory lane and look at 7 awesome vintage snowmobiles!

really awesome vintage snowmobiles

The 7 Best Vintage Snowmobiles Through the Ages

People like to say, “They don’t make them like they used to.” While we’re pretty big fans of all the innovations in making more efficient engines and safer sleds, seeing these old models definitely brings you back. How many of these classic sleds do you remember from the glory days?

1966 Arctic Cat Panther 

the 1966 vintage arctic cat panther snowmobile

The early Arctic Cat Panthers were legendary in many respects. The first reason for this being on our list is that this is one of the sleds that secured Arctic Cat’s place as a major snowmobile name. In the mid and late 1960s, Ski-Doo was the major name in the snowmobiling world. However, with the Panther, Arctic Cat began to break out from the pack.

Not only did we get a beautiful body from the Panther, but it also had a beautiful design. Fiberglass replaced heavy iron on the hood, shedding a lot of weight off the sled. It also featured slide rails instead of rollers inside the track. This snowmobile also had the engine placed in the front rather than the middle or back of the sled, giving riders weight where they needed it to help with traction. It was an innovative machine, and if you can believe it, beautiful, too.

1975 Ski-Doo TNT 

the 1975 vintage ski doo TNT snowmobile

Speaking of the big boys on the block, how about the 1975 Ski-Doo TNT? That’s not “TNT” as in “this sled is the bomb” (although it is), but actually Track n’ Trail. This sled was truly ready for it all. The first model of TNT was released in 1969, and this model persisted for over a decade. 

Most notable about this snowmobile was the sleek, trimmed-down design. You can see a definite progression in design between the comparatively clunky Panther and the slimmer TNT, especially in regard to aerodynamics. This Ski-Doo really put its focus on great handling and performance. 

1976 Yamaha SRX 340 

the shiny 1976 yamaha SRX 340 snowmobile

At its inception, the SRX was meant for a single purpose: speed. This model was designed to go fast, make tight turns, and keep cruising until the 2.6-gallon gas tank ran dry. The sled had aluminum skis, a tachometer because the speedometer was optional, and no windshield. We’re talking bare-bones speed.

Something really special about the ‘76 edition, the SRX 340, was that this was the first Yamaha to use a liquid-cooled engine. While earlier models were released as great options for normal trail riding, the SRX 340 was only meant as a race sled. It did the job well.

1980 Polaris TXL Indy 

the 1980 polaris TXL indy

In the earlier days of snowmobile riding, sleds were made for just that purpose – riding. Racing wasn’t as hot a spot as it is these days. We didn’t see many designs specifically for speed, but if you’re paying attention, you can see that those are some of our favorites. The Polaris TXL Indy was another one of these race sleds built to absolutely smoke the competition.

The Polaris TXL Indy featured great handling, sleek design, and really great suspension that made it easy to ride. You might often see in those days that factory racers could really only win on the sled they knew best. The TXL Indy was so well-rounded that just about anyone could hop on and start competing – and do it well. 

1980 Yamaha Enticer 

the 1980 yamaha enticer

Okay, so we’ve talked about some race sleds, but those aren’t the only ones that matter to us. All snowmobiles are beautiful! So how about we take a look at one of the most well-rounded factory vintage snowmobiles from the glory days, the Yamaha Enticer!

It didn’t have the sharp angles of the race sleds or the intimidating front end. That’s because the Enticer didn’t need them. What the Enticer offered was a great entry-level sled that any Tom, Dick, or Harry could hop on and have a great time. It was designed for easy use, with an oil-injection engine and disc brakes, but it retailed for only $1,000 dollars when it first came out in 1977. 

If you were a newer rider looking for something that you could enjoy without getting in too far over your head with mechanics, this was a perfect choice.

1982 Arctic Cat Jag 

1982 arctic cat jag vintage snowmobiles

Around the early ‘80s, we start to see snowmobiles taking a much more familiar shape. One of our favorite sleds from this time is the Arctic Cat Jag. Its design was much closer to our contemporary ideas of how a sled looks, unlike its more boxy predecessors. The Jag had a windshield, speedometer, great rear suspension, and looked pretty, to boot. 

While this wasn’t one of the top-tier sleds giving onlookers whiplash, it was a beautiful and solid machine. It was another great design from Arctic Cat that helped to keep them at the forefront of snowmobile design at the time.

1984 Yamaha Phazer 

1984 yamaha phazer was one of the coolest vintage snowmobiles

While they can’t all be winning race sleds, the Yamaha Phazer was definitely one of the winners. The Phazer’s cousin, the Enticer, was a great entry-level snowmobile. The Phazer, on the other hand, was what you would upgrade to once you got a taste for Yamaha engineering. 

So what made the Phazer so slick? It’s all in that aerodynamic design. A pivoting headlight aided in safely making it through the course. The excellent IFS and long-travel rear suspension gave it incredible handling. The combination of the sled’s lightweight and the tapered body and running boards made it hard to keep up with on the snow.

Our Picks for the Best Vintage Snowmobiles

We’ve come a long way in the snowmobiling world. Personally, we’re pretty glad that a speedometer comes stock on your sled now. How else can you know if you’re feeding the need for speed?

But, ignoring our technological advancements, there’s just something about those old sleds. The clunky bodies, the work, and dedication we put into vintage snowmobiles… the falls and scrapes we took along the way. It was all part of the learning curve. Looking back on it now, we wouldn’t have it any other way.

TMS Parts Shows You How to Winterize a Motorcycle

how to winterize a motorcycle

How to Store your Bike until Next Riding Season

It’s officially the saddest time of the year: time to think about putting your bike into storage. For some of us in the sunniest states, it’s not something you need to worry about. For the rest of us living in a winter wonderland, storing your bike for the winter months is essential. There are a few schools of thought as to the best methods for winterizing a motorcycle. However, not all of these methods work equally well, and we want to dispel the myths. So if you’ve never done it before, or you want to see if you’ve been doing it right, here’s everything you need to know about how to winterize a motorcycle. 

Simple Steps for Winterizing Your Motorcycle

Here are a few simple steps for winterizing your motorcycle. Follow along to give your bike the best protection until those temperatures start to rise again.

take your motorcycle inside

Keep Exposed Metal Safe – Take it Inside

The best advice will always be to keep your bike inside a temperature-controlled environment like a garage. The main reason for doing so is to protect against condensation. Condensation can cause corrosion and rust that will ruin the integrity of your motorcycle.

Of course, not all of us have access to a temperature-controlled garage. One great alternative is to rent a storage unit for your bike. Many are temperature-controlled. Even if it’s not, your bike is far better off sitting inside a storage unit than parked on the street with a tarp over it. 

It’s going to save you from damage caused by condensation and one other thing. One of the biggest enemies to your stored motorcycle is going to be animals like field mice, rats, and more that are looking for a warm place to sleep. Keeping your bike inside doesn’t just keep the cold out, it keeps the critters out, too. 

Also, make sure when your bike is ready for storage that you seal it up. Plug up any hole (like your exhaust) with anything you have handy to keep animals from making it their winter getaway.

fresh lube oil and a coat of wax is how to winterize a motorcycle

Fresh Oil, Lube, and a Coat of Wax

Using a motorcycle-specific soap, wash down your bike. Get off all the dirt, bugs, and other debris it’s been collecting this season. This is going to protect the paint while it’s sitting for a while. Make sure you put a fresh layer of wax over the painted surfaces for extra protection.

Likewise, you want to treat any exposed metal surfaces with polish for the same reason. You also want to treat any moving parts with lubricant. If your bike is going to be sitting for a few months, this will help it wake up and get rolling in the spring. 

If you’ve got a chain-driven bike, don’t forget about that chain! Take your bike out for one last good ride and get the chain warm. Then when you’re ready to winterize your motorcycle, hit the chain with a fresh layer of lubricant. Doing this while your chain is still warm will help to move the lubricant throughout all of the pieces of the chain. Of course, this results in better protection from rust.

wondering how to winterize a motorcycle? winterize the fuel system too

Winterize Your Fuel System

There are two methods for protecting your fuel system. The first is to simply empty your tank entirely. Left sitting for a long time, gasoline can turn into a dense sludge that your bike won’t be able to ignite. It can ruin your fuel tank and potentially your bike.

The second method is to fill your fuel tank and add some fuel stabilizer to the tank. You want to put your motorcycle into storage with the gas tank at about 90% full if you choose this method. This is going to prevent condensation from forming in your tank. Adding a fuel stabilizer and letting it run through your bike’s fuel system will keep your fuel fresh and healthy.

time to do some work!

Fresh Oil and Filters

Nothing fancy here. You just want to be prepared for that first spring ride. Along with your fuel, you don’t want your old oil to get stale sitting around for a few months. You can prevent that from happening by changing your oil and filters. This is going to keep the inside of your engine happy and healthy.

Check Your Levels

To give your bike the full treatment, you really want to change your brake fluid, clutch fluid, and transmission fluid if your bike uses them. At the very least, you want to top off those levels to make sure your bike is ready for the first spring ride. 

Remove the Battery

This is another simple one. You just want to remove your battery and make sure you store it in a cool, dry place. If you have an older battery, you might want to think about picking up a battery tender. That way you can make sure your battery keeps its charge over winter.

keep your tires good by figuring out how to winterize a motorcycle for the cold weather

Keep Your Tires Protected From Flat Spots

When you finally winterize your motorcycle, it’s going to be in one place for a long time. During that time you want to take the stress off of your tires. Use a center stand (not your kickstand) to elevate your bike. Getting your tires off the ground will keep them from forming flat spots where it’s been sitting. 

If you don’t have a center stand, put a rug or piece of plywood under your tires. This will help prevent those flat spots and will also keep your tires from absorbing moisture from the ground.

how to winterize a motorcycle for a better spring ride

Winterizing Your Motorcycle For a Better Spring Ride

Winterizing your motorcycle can take some work. However, don’t focus on the work. Focus on how much easier it’s going to be getting back on the road in spring. If you properly winterize your motorcycle, getting it running when the weather gets warmer will be a snap. If you’re planning on doing a little early riding, make sure you check out our tips for winter riding and stay safe out there!

TMS Parts’ Tips for Mudding with Your ATV

TMS Parts' Tips for Mudding with Your ATV

What you Need to Know Before You Go Out Mud Riding

Summer is generally considered the prime-time of the year to get your ATV out on the trails. The weather is nice, trail conditions are good, and you’ve got the most sunlight you’ll get all year. But just because the sun has now started setting earlier doesn’t mean you need to put the ATV away just yet! Sure, you probably shouldn’t go riding in the rain, but hitting the muddy trails after a good rainfall is just as much fun as summer riding! But before you take a serious spill, we have some tips for mudding with your ATV!

What you Need to Know Before You Go Out Mud Riding

What’s the Difference Between Normal Riding and Mud Riding?

When you take your ATV out on the trail in the summertime, the dirt is nice and dry. Your tires can easily cut through the dirt particles and grip into the earth propelling you forward. Now let’s think about that same trail when you want to go mudding with your ATV. 

When water sinks into that same dirt, the water acts as a bonding agent. The dry dirt, made of billions of small particles now becomes a much less permeable mass of mud and water. You lose traction in the mud because the once coarse particles are now both slippery and bonding to each other making a terrain that’s much harder to penetrate. 

Tips for Mudding With Your ATV

Tips for Mudding With Your ATV

Mud Tires

Most ATV’s come stock with all-terrain tires. The tread designs in these tires give you the ability to grip on to dirt when you’re offroading as well as the pavement when you’re on the road. This makes it easy for you to get your ATV to different trails without needing a trailer or truck to tow it.

It also means you’re losing out on more traction in the mud. If you’re planning on doing some dedicated mudding, you definitely want to consider investing in mud tires. The long treads of the tires do a great job of digging down into the earth for those coarse particles to grip on to. It will give you better throttle response than you’ve ever felt when mudding with your ATV.

Tips for Mudding With Your ATV

Snorkel Kit

Part of the fun of going mudding is hitting those deep mud pits. But when you’re ground clearance level is about up to your shoulders, your ATV isn’t having as much fun as you are. If you want to hit those puddles that are deep enough to cover your exhaust, you really want to think about a snorkel kit. 

There are a few important components you want to make sure are getting the proper air intake/exhaust with your snorkel kit. These most essential parts are your airbox and your clutch kit, specifically the belt housing intake and exhaust.

Some other parts you might want to consider covering:

  • Electrical Connections
  • Crankcase Breather Tube
  • Differential Vents
  • Carb Vent Tubes 
make sure you're doing some upgrades for mudding with you atv

Upgrade Your Skid Plates

When you go mudding with your ATV, you’re mostly just thinking about the mud. But there’s a lot more under the surface. Tree roots, big rocks, and branches are just some of the things that are going to be assaulting the undercarriage of your ATV. Your ATV was made to be tough, but over time, a lot of abuse is going to put your ATV’s health in jeopardy

Your stock skid plates are meant to protect your frame from accidental damage. However, the stock plate isn’t as tough as it could be. Your stock plates are meant for protection against small rocks and other debris that gets kicked up by your tires. However, it was not meant to protect your against a boulder you can’t see in a deep mud puddle that you confidently hit at 25 mph. 

atv mudding for the win

Mudding With Your ATV: Go Prepared

You wouldn’t put a stock Honda civic onto a NASCAR racetrack. Why not? Because it’s going to get blown out of the proverbial water by cars that are better equipped to handle the situation at hand. So why do it to your stock ATV? If you’re making the decision to become a dedicated mud rider, you need to have the right tools for the job. When you go mudding with your ATV, you want to be prepared for what you know you’re going to encounter. That’s the way you’re going to get the most out of your mud season.

Snowmobile Maintenance Tips: Prepping Your Sled for the Winter

snowmobile maintenance tips for winter

Getting Your Snowmobile in Working Order Before You Hit the Trails

Can you feel it in the air? The cold nights, the crisp wind, winter is almost here! It’s been a great summer and fall for ATV and dirtbike riding, but now it’s time to give your snowmobile it’s time to shine! But before you hit the trails for the day with your buds, you have to make sure that your snowmobile is ready for the season. Here’s everything that should be on your snowmobile maintenance checklist this year!

snowmobile maintenance tips and checklist

Snowmobile Maintenance Tips and Checklist

One thing you want to do before starting any of this is to take a look at your owner’s manual. Make sure that you know any critical information about fluid types your ride requires, manufacturer suggestions for track tension and anything else. This will give you an idea of how things should look and feel, and it’s also going to keep you from voiding your warranty!

time to get in that garage and fix up the ol snowmobile

Visual Inspection

Before you start really getting into anything, you just want to give the entire snowmobile a quick visual inspection. You’re just looking for any sort of major cracks, dents, breaks, or anything else out of the ordinary. Take a look at your drive belt, how your rear suspension is sitting, and everything else.

Make a checklist of anything you note. Even if it’s not critical, it’s something you can get to when you have some time later on.

check the fluid levels and filters

Fluid Levels and Filters

In a perfect world, we drained all the fluids from our snowmobile in spring after the season was over. That means gasoline, coolant, and brake fluid. If you’re like me and you’re a little less than perfect, you want to drain your old gasoline at the very least. Gasoline that’s been sitting over spring and summer can deteriorate and really reduce your snowmobile’s performance.

Top off any coolant or brake fluid that your snowmobile needs. Or if you want to strive for that perfect, drain them and replace them entirely. As far as your filters go, you should be replacing them every 1,000 miles or so. If you replaced yours at the end of last season, you should be all set to go!

 snowmobiles you have to check out

Check Your Electronics

Make sure that your head and tail lights are in working order. Replace any bulbs as needed. It’s also a good idea to check your battery. Especially if you have an electric starter. If it’s not holding a proper charge, it’s time to swap it out. You don’t want to be 20 miles in the woods with a snowmobile that you can’t start.

check your skis and adjust your track

Check Your Skis and Adjust Your Track

Your skis are one of the most important parts of your snowmobile, so you want to make sure they’re ready for riding season. If you have steel skis, you want to inspect them for any holes in them. For plastic skis, you want to look for any major gouges, and replace if necessary.

Of course, your track is just as important for traction and handling. Check for any tears, missing lugs, or if you’ve studded your track, any missing studs. Then you want to adjust it for proper tension that feels comfortable for you. Take the play out of it, but don’t tighten it too much!

polish it on up and break out the grease gun

Break Out the Grease Gun

That’s if you didn’t already apply chaincase oil in the Spring. If you didn’t, no worries! Your snowmobile won’t suffer for sitting with the old oil. But make sure that you change your chaincase oil at least once every year. 

make sure you follow these awesome snowmobile maintenance tips

Polish it Up!

One final step is to just give your baby a little TLC! Clean it, polish it, get all that dirt and grime off of it and make it shine like new! The cleaner you keep your ride the better it will perform over the years.

get out there

Snowmobile Maintenance Tips for Getting Ready for Riding Season

Getting your snowmobile ready for winter doesn’t have to be a huge undertaking. Most of these snowmobile maintenance tips take only a few minutes, and they’re great for giving your ride a long, healthy life. There are plenty of other repair jobs you can do yourself that are also going to give you a better ride. We hope you’re snow-season, and hopefully, this gives you a little help getting there!