Snowmobile Repair Work You Can Do Yourself

snowmobile repair work that you can DIY makes you feel like this guy

Snowmobile Repair: Keep Your Sled in Good Condition Without the Mechanic Bills

 

Not every tiny setback with your snowmobile should have you running for the phone to call your local repair shop. In fact, in the middle of winter, you have to expect that your local shop is going to have a sizable backlog of snowmobile repair work on deck. So don’t let those long wait times deter you from taking care of your sled. In the long run, maintaining your snowmobile is going to take much less time, money and effort than repairing it will.

So before you let your sled break down, take a look at this list of snowmobile repair work that you can do for yourself at home.

 

Snowmobile repair work shouldn't keep you off the trails

 

Be Prepared to Take on Snowmobile Repair Work at Home

 

Before you get the toolbox out and have to deal with a pool of oil seeping across the garage, make sure you have the right knowledge for the job! Don’t start the work without your snowmobile’s correct repair manual. It’s going to tell you everything you need to know about making adjustments and handling regular maintenance or full-on repairs.

Also, when in doubt, check out YouTube! It’s a guarantee that you’re not the first person to experience whatever problem your sled has. It’s also a pretty safe bet that someone has taken the time to record themselves making that same snowmobile repair, or adjustment, and has uploaded their tutorial to YouTube. No matter how handy a person you are, it’s always good to have some reassurance that you’re making the right moves.

 

Before embarking on snowmobile repair work, so you can hit the trails like this guy, read through your manual.

 

Fluid Levels are Important

 

One of the most obvious things to do at home is the same thing you do with your car. Maintain those fluid levels. Regularly change your snowmobile’s oil according to the manufacturer guidelines. This is going to keep your sled happy and running healthy all season long. It will also minimize any snowmobile repair work you will need to tackle down the line.

You need to think about your chaincase oil, too. This also needs to be changed in with certain frequency and is every bit as important as your engine oil. Keep your drive train happy and healthy for a long time by following those helpful manufacturer guidelines.

Again, don’t go in blind if you don’t know what you’re doing! Check out trusted resources like this great tutorial on oil changes from snowmobile.com.

 

Keep on the trails like this guy and make sure your snowmobile repair work is minimized through regular maintenance

 

Adjust the Chain Tension

 

If you’re thinking about your chaincase oil, it’s probably a good idea to think about your chain tension as well. A loose chain is going to skip and possibly even grind on your sprockets. This can cause damage which is going to leave you in need of those professional snowmobile repairs.

Get Greasy!

 

Grease is the lifeblood of your snowmobile. Get some fresh grease in all the spots that need it: rear and front suspension, the steering components, and the drivetrain are all going to need it at certain intervals. Make sure to take a look around to see what it needs.

 

Snowmobile repair work can be done with basic tools like these wrenches.

 

Perform Regular Snowmobile Maintenance

 

Certain parts of your sled are going to wear down over time, like your bolts and fasteners. You also need to think about your clutches. Make sure to take regular looks at all of these components. Your clutches need to be cleaned periodically, and sometimes even rebuilt, but you’ll never know if you’re not keeping with a schedule. This might sound like a lot of work, but you’ll be breathing a sigh of relief when you don’t have to face those bills from the snowmobile repair shop.

 

Keep it Clean!

 

This might sound like a no-brainer, but we’ve all got that friend. The person with a sled that’s always covered in salt and mud and whatever else they’re picking up. While they might be going for that “battle-scarred” look, it’s not going to look as cool when their sled turns into a pile of corroded rust. You wouldn’t let your car go all winter without a trip to the car wash, so don’t submit your sled to that kind of torture!

 

Make an Inspection Schedule for Your Snowmobile

 

Some things don’t have specific end dates. Your hyfax and carbides are vital to the performance of your sled, but you can’t just say they need to be replaced every X amount of miles. Make a schedule for yourself to routinely check out the health of your hyfax and carbides.

Inspect your lights as well. Headlights and tail lights might not be something we typically think of as needing repairs, but it’s something your snowmobile needs in order to be safe. You don’t want to be riding home at sunset and find out that one or both of your headlights are out.

 

Is your snowmobile in need of repairs or are you taking care of things at home so you can ride like this guy?

 

Lots of Snowmobile Repair Work Can Be Done By You

 

With the right knowledge, there’s no need to take your snowmobile into the shop for professional hands (and professional bills) for every little thing. Not to mention the season is only so long, and you want your sled to spend as much time on the trails, and at as many snowmobiling events, as possible.

Some repairs and maintenance are easy enough to do at home. Save yourself some cash this season and take matters into your own hands!

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